De(s)ign

deign

-verb

1. to think fit or in accordance with one's dignity.

2. to condescend to give or grant.

design

-verb

1. to plan and fashion artistically or skillfully.

2. to intend for a definite purpose.

3. to form or conceive in the mind; contrive.

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my tweets

my photos

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Apr 18
Permalink
artist Michael Jones McKean made a working rainbow maker at the Bemis Center in Omaha.   it ran twice a day for 20 min during the summer of 2012.
"six 10,500 gallon water storage tanks, modified downspout system, 60 horse power turbine pump, UV water filter, galvanized piping"
project page
artist page
info from Bemis
video
#wishihaddoneit

artist Michael Jones McKean made a working rainbow maker at the Bemis Center in Omaha.   it ran twice a day for 20 min during the summer of 2012.

"six 10,500 gallon water storage tanks, modified downspout system, 60 horse power turbine pump, UV water filter, galvanized piping"

project page

artist page

info from Bemis

video

#wishihaddoneit

Mar 25
Permalink
what’s that mysterious glow in the circle?  has a massive metropolis popped up in the middle of north dakota?  it’s not a city.  those lights weren’t there six years ago.
they are flares, from “an immense and startlingly new oil and gas field — nighttime evidence of an oil boom created by a technology called fracking. Those lights are rigs, hundreds of them, lit at night, or fiery flares of natural gas. One hundred fifty oil companies, big ones, little ones, wildcatters, have flooded this region, drilling up to eight new wells every day on what is called the Bakken formation.”
the deposits are 2 miles below the surface.
A blogger from the NRDC says the drillers "burn off enough gas to heat half a million homes," every day in North Dakota.  
source - NPR
Illustration by NPR/NASA

what’s that mysterious glow in the circle?  has a massive metropolis popped up in the middle of north dakota?  it’s not a city.  those lights weren’t there six years ago.

they are flares, from “an immense and startlingly new oil and gas field — nighttime evidence of an oil boom created by a technology called fracking. Those lights are rigs, hundreds of them, lit at night, or fiery flares of natural gas. One hundred fifty oil companies, big ones, little ones, wildcatters, have flooded this region, drilling up to eight new wells every day on what is called the Bakken formation.”

the deposits are 2 miles below the surface.

A blogger from the NRDC says the drillers "burn off enough gas to heat half a million homes," every day in North Dakota. 

source - NPR

Illustration by NPR/NASA

Feb 19
Permalink

ice, the size of Manhattan, leaves its home and comes for your shores.

"The video comes from photographer James Balog’s film, Chasing Ice. The two guys on the bluff at the beginning are part of Balog’s Extreme Ice Survey team, which maintains scores of time-lapse cameras overlooking glaciers in Greenland, Iceland, Alaska, Canada, the Rockies and the Himalayas. During daylight hours, they watch and record. Then they share what they see with scientists and National Geographic, and turn the footage into movies and TV shows.”

npr post

Jan 31
Permalink
pic of a natural gas liquefaction facility in LA.  this is similar to the one proposed by Virginia-based Dominion Resources for Cove Point in southern Maryland.  quite a feat of engineering.   the plant will run an “industrial-scale compressor, a massive refrigeration system and an adjacent, surreal six-story-tall ‘sound wall’ to protect humans and wildlife from the thunderous noise. The facility as a whole would chill the gas—extracted from fracking wells as far away as New York—to 260 degrees below zero so it can be poured onto huge tankers (with Coast Guard escort due to terrorism risks) and then shipped more than 6,000 miles to India and Japan.”
turns out that shipping our LNG overseas for consumption and combustion there is worse than burning local coal.  Worse.  
and it only benefits gas execs.  all other Americans will pay more for energy if this project goes forward. 
check Bill's article on the Cove Point plant here

pic of a natural gas liquefaction facility in LA.  this is similar to the one proposed by Virginia-based Dominion Resources for Cove Point in southern Maryland.  quite a feat of engineering.   the plant will run an “industrial-scale compressor, a massive refrigeration system and an adjacent, surreal six-story-tall ‘sound wall’ to protect humans and wildlife from the thunderous noise. The facility as a whole would chill the gas—extracted from fracking wells as far away as New York—to 260 degrees below zero so it can be poured onto huge tankers (with Coast Guard escort due to terrorism risks) and then shipped more than 6,000 miles to India and Japan.”

turns out that shipping our LNG overseas for consumption and combustion there is worse than burning local coal.  Worse.  

and it only benefits gas execs.  all other Americans will pay more for energy if this project goes forward. 

check Bill's article on the Cove Point plant here

Jan 24
Permalink

Correction.  The screen shows ads.  

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The City of Beijing has installed huge screen to show the sunrise.  The smog is so think, no one can see it unassisted.

In honor of national “Shout Out for Solar" day, I will mention that installing solar power would help them reduce their dependance on coal.  But now, the solar index is so bad there that they cannot produce enough power to make solar feasible.  Also, that screen and kWh?  I bet it gulps, not sips. 

Daily Mail article here

Jan 08
Permalink
Man is a tool-using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.
— Thomas Carlyle
Permalink

i want a cubli

designed and built by researchers at Switzerland’s Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control

Dec 26
Permalink

This movie shows how an old Second World War bunker in the Netherlands was turned into a sculptural visitor attraction by cutting it and removing a section in the middle. It took 40 days to slice through the concrete.

from this site

Sep 20
Permalink

MIDWAY, a Message from the Gyre is a short film by Chris Jordan.

film site

Sep 19
Permalink
"The Mechatronic Variable Speed Drive (MVSD) is a wholly unique and robust innovation to the world of transmissions and variable speed drives. Variable Speed Drives (VSDs) are a class of mechanical or electronic technology that varies the speed of an electric (AC) motor in response to the demand placed on it by what it is moving."
Anthony Wong started inMotive to bring his idea for a better motor to market.  ”The MVSD can offer double the torque of a variable-frequency drive for the same energy. He added that the drive offers about 30 percent to 50 percent lower capital costs and about 10 percent to 15 percent greater efficiency over the most efficient motors on the market.”
"Electric motors make up one of the largest sets of electricity consumers in the world, constituting up to 46% of global consumption. Their proper application and operation is essential for decreased capital costs, operational efficiencies and GHG reductions to satisfy policy requirements."
Motors are ubiquitous; they are energy-sucking devices.  Our economy and our climate require a leap in the energy efficiency of motors.  Most motors are oversized because of high torque requirements that are rarely needed during the motor’s typical operation.
"A motor at a sawmill may need the torque to push a blade through a knot in the wood, for instance, but most of the time, the oversized motors are running pretty inefficiently.  …  Seventy-five percent of industrial motors operate at less than 60 percent capacity.  There are about 75 million electric motors that could benefit from the company’s patented technology, inMotive president Paul Bottero told journalists on a media tour in Ontario.  The variable-speed drive involves gears that move under the chain, rather than a chain that moves over sprockets. The drive uses a combination of mechanical, computer, electrical and control engineering for variable speeds."
GTM article
video

"The Mechatronic Variable Speed Drive (MVSD) is a wholly unique and robust innovation to the world of transmissions and variable speed drives. Variable Speed Drives (VSDs) are a class of mechanical or electronic technology that varies the speed of an electric (AC) motor in response to the demand placed on it by what it is moving."

Anthony Wong started inMotive to bring his idea for a better motor to market.  ”The MVSD can offer double the torque of a variable-frequency drive for the same energy. He added that the drive offers about 30 percent to 50 percent lower capital costs and about 10 percent to 15 percent greater efficiency over the most efficient motors on the market.”

"Electric motors make up one of the largest sets of electricity consumers in the world, constituting up to 46% of global consumption. Their proper application and operation is essential for decreased capital costs, operational efficiencies and GHG reductions to satisfy policy requirements."

Motors are ubiquitous; they are energy-sucking devices.  Our economy and our climate require a leap in the energy efficiency of motors.  Most motors are oversized because of high torque requirements that are rarely needed during the motor’s typical operation.

"A motor at a sawmill may need the torque to push a blade through a knot in the wood, for instance, but most of the time, the oversized motors are running pretty inefficiently.  …  Seventy-five percent of industrial motors operate at less than 60 percent capacity.  There are about 75 million electric motors that could benefit from the company’s patented technology, inMotive president Paul Bottero told journalists on a media tour in Ontario.  The variable-speed drive involves gears that move under the chain, rather than a chain that moves over sprockets. The drive uses a combination of mechanical, computer, electrical and control engineering for variable speeds."

GTM article

video